What Is Long-Term Care?

Long-term care refers to a comprehensive range of medical, personal, and social services coordinated to meet the physical, social, and emotional needs of people who are chronically ill or disabled. A nursing home facility may be the best choice for people who require 24-hour medical care and supervision.

What Type of Care Do Nursing Homes Provide?

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care -- like bathing, getting dressed, and eating -- as well as skilled care. Skilled nursing care is given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments.

How Can I Find the Right Nursing Home?

Finding the right nursing home takes time. It is important to begin the search for a suitable nursing home well in advance of seeking admission to the facility. There are often long waiting periods for available accommodations. Planning ahead also can make the transition of moving into a nursing home much easier.

About Nursing Homes

A nursing home, convalescent home, skilled nursing facility (SNF), care home, rest home or intermediate care provides a type of residential care. It is a place of residence for people who require continual nursing care and have significant difficulty coping with the required activities of daily living. Nursing aides and skilled nurses are usually available 24 hours a day.

Residents include the elderly and younger adults with physical or mental disabilities. Residents in a skilled nursing facility may also receive physical, occupational, and other rehabilitative therapies following an accident or illness. Some nursing homes assist people with special needs, such as Alzheimer patients.

Residents may have specific legal rights depending on the nation the facility is in.

Before the Industrial Revolution, elderly care was largely in the hands of the family who would support elderly relatives who could no longer do so themselves. Charitable institutions and parish poor relief were other sources of care.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care—like bathing, getting dressed, and eating—as well as skilled care given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments. Skilled care also includes services provided by specially trained professionals, such as physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists

Features included

  • 3 Chef-prepared meals daily and restaurant style dining
  • Dynamic calendar of activities, outings and Watercrest Institute classes
  • Salon and Spa Services on-site
  • Coastal Living design complete with pool, verandas, and outdoor living spaces
  • Spacious apartments with washer, dryer, and kitchenettes
  • 24-hour licensed staffing and world class personal care
  • Wellness programs
  • Pet friendly environment
  • A state-of-the-art wireless resident call system
  • Medication management available
  • Preventative health screenings
  • High apartment ceilings and spa showers
  • Transportation services seven days per week
  • Housekeeping services
  • Maintenance services
  • Utilities and cable included
  • Move-in coordination
  • Respite stay accommodations

Readmission prevention: The role of post-acute providers

in Blog
Created: 16 January 2018
Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Readmission prevention: The role of post-acute providers Long-term care providers have an opportunity to thrive with value-based care, escape cynicism and join the growing wave successful at avoiding readmissions. Last week, I was part of a panel discussing readmission prevention at the National Readmission Prevention Collaborative’s […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Readmission prevention: The role of post-acute providers Long-term care providers have an opportunity to thrive with value-based care, escape cynicism and join the growing wave successful at avoiding readmissions. Last week, I was part of a panel discussing readmission prevention at the National Readmission Prevention Collaborative’s […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News:

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Readmission prevention: The role of post-acute providers

Long-term care providers have an opportunity to thrive with value-based care, escape cynicism and join the growing wave successful at avoiding readmissions.

Last week, I was part of a panel discussing readmission prevention at the National Readmission Prevention Collaborative’s C-Suite Invitational: New York Transformational Healthcare, which focused on Accountable Care Organizations, bundles and readmissions. The goal of the forum was identifying ways for providers at all ends of the healthcare continuum to prevent hospital readmissions and to thrive in a value-based care model.

Unlike fee-for-service care, which compensates providers for each procedure, value-based care pays for the episode of care, making it essential to coordinate between providers and to avoid unnecessary medical utilization. Efforts to avert hospitalization and readmission are paramount.

The conference offered several takeaways for skilled nursing facilities and other post-acute providers.

From hospital to post-acute provider

Presenters emphasized the importance of being part of a continuing care network rather than a stand-alone facility and of working closely with referral sources. Because crucial information is easily lost during care transitions, best practices suggest a “warm handoff” rather than an exchange of information on paper or via computer, meaning that providers have an actual conversation about care.

To facilitate this, both the referral source, such as the hospital, and the accepting organization, such as the nursing home, should have someone to collect and relay information. To reduce costs, this needn’t be a clinical role as long as the necessary details are conveyed. Communication can be streamlined using a “hotline” between the hospital and the post-acute provider so that phone calls can be made directly rather than routing through the emergency department.

The transition to home

Hospitals are being monitored for readmissions and may have several post-acute care options. The facility most likely to prevent rehospitalization after discharging residents is the one most likely to get referrals.

For the entire article, visit:

Readmission prevention: The role of post-acute providers


Read full article on mybetternursinghome.com