What Is Long-Term Care?

Long-term care refers to a comprehensive range of medical, personal, and social services coordinated to meet the physical, social, and emotional needs of people who are chronically ill or disabled. A nursing home facility may be the best choice for people who require 24-hour medical care and supervision.

What Type of Care Do Nursing Homes Provide?

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care -- like bathing, getting dressed, and eating -- as well as skilled care. Skilled nursing care is given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments.

How Can I Find the Right Nursing Home?

Finding the right nursing home takes time. It is important to begin the search for a suitable nursing home well in advance of seeking admission to the facility. There are often long waiting periods for available accommodations. Planning ahead also can make the transition of moving into a nursing home much easier.

About Nursing Homes

A nursing home, convalescent home, skilled nursing facility (SNF), care home, rest home or intermediate care provides a type of residential care. It is a place of residence for people who require continual nursing care and have significant difficulty coping with the required activities of daily living. Nursing aides and skilled nurses are usually available 24 hours a day.

Residents include the elderly and younger adults with physical or mental disabilities. Residents in a skilled nursing facility may also receive physical, occupational, and other rehabilitative therapies following an accident or illness. Some nursing homes assist people with special needs, such as Alzheimer patients.

Residents may have specific legal rights depending on the nation the facility is in.

Before the Industrial Revolution, elderly care was largely in the hands of the family who would support elderly relatives who could no longer do so themselves. Charitable institutions and parish poor relief were other sources of care.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care—like bathing, getting dressed, and eating—as well as skilled care given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments. Skilled care also includes services provided by specially trained professionals, such as physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists

Features included

  • 3 Chef-prepared meals daily and restaurant style dining
  • Dynamic calendar of activities, outings and Watercrest Institute classes
  • Salon and Spa Services on-site
  • Coastal Living design complete with pool, verandas, and outdoor living spaces
  • Spacious apartments with washer, dryer, and kitchenettes
  • 24-hour licensed staffing and world class personal care
  • Wellness programs
  • Pet friendly environment
  • A state-of-the-art wireless resident call system
  • Medication management available
  • Preventative health screenings
  • High apartment ceilings and spa showers
  • Transportation services seven days per week
  • Housekeeping services
  • Maintenance services
  • Utilities and cable included
  • Move-in coordination
  • Respite stay accommodations

You and your staff are very different: Use it to your advantage

in Blog
Created: 16 January 2018
Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: You and your staff are very different: Use it to your advantage I often speak with healthcare groups, giving psychological insights about a variety of issues within long-term care. Sometimes I address a C-suite audience; other times I train direct care staff. I noticed during the […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: You and your staff are very different: Use it to your advantage I often speak with healthcare groups, giving psychological insights about a variety of issues within long-term care. Sometimes I address a C-suite audience; other times I train direct care staff. I noticed during the […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News:

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You and your staff are very different: Use it to your advantage

I often speak with healthcare groups, giving psychological insights about a variety of issues within long-term care. Sometimes I address a C-suite audience; other times I train direct care staff.

I noticed during the course of these talks that some of the group exercises that generated excitement and intense discussion among direct care staff were met with relative restraint when presented to executives.

After pondering the discrepancy in reactions, I adjusted my talks accordingly and came to this conclusion: Healthcare executives and managers are very different from those they manage.

Understanding and utilizing these differences can facilitate leadership in a variety of ways.

How execs differ from direct care staff

We can consider the discrepancies between the two groups by looking at the traits generally exhibited by each. I’ve borrowed a tool from career counselors, who test their clients’ personality traits to determine what types of jobs best suit them.

One such test is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, which examines four different aspects of an individual’s personality as it relates to career choice. The summary below is from an article with a handy chart based on the book, “Do What You Are.”

For the entire article, visit:

You and your staff are very different: Use it to your advantage


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