What Is Long-Term Care?

Long-term care refers to a comprehensive range of medical, personal, and social services coordinated to meet the physical, social, and emotional needs of people who are chronically ill or disabled. A nursing home facility may be the best choice for people who require 24-hour medical care and supervision.

What Type of Care Do Nursing Homes Provide?

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care -- like bathing, getting dressed, and eating -- as well as skilled care. Skilled nursing care is given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments.

How Can I Find the Right Nursing Home?

Finding the right nursing home takes time. It is important to begin the search for a suitable nursing home well in advance of seeking admission to the facility. There are often long waiting periods for available accommodations. Planning ahead also can make the transition of moving into a nursing home much easier.

About Nursing Homes

A nursing home, convalescent home, skilled nursing facility (SNF), care home, rest home or intermediate care provides a type of residential care. It is a place of residence for people who require continual nursing care and have significant difficulty coping with the required activities of daily living. Nursing aides and skilled nurses are usually available 24 hours a day.

Residents include the elderly and younger adults with physical or mental disabilities. Residents in a skilled nursing facility may also receive physical, occupational, and other rehabilitative therapies following an accident or illness. Some nursing homes assist people with special needs, such as Alzheimer patients.

Residents may have specific legal rights depending on the nation the facility is in.

Before the Industrial Revolution, elderly care was largely in the hands of the family who would support elderly relatives who could no longer do so themselves. Charitable institutions and parish poor relief were other sources of care.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care—like bathing, getting dressed, and eating—as well as skilled care given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments. Skilled care also includes services provided by specially trained professionals, such as physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists

Features included

  • 3 Chef-prepared meals daily and restaurant style dining
  • Dynamic calendar of activities, outings and Watercrest Institute classes
  • Salon and Spa Services on-site
  • Coastal Living design complete with pool, verandas, and outdoor living spaces
  • Spacious apartments with washer, dryer, and kitchenettes
  • 24-hour licensed staffing and world class personal care
  • Wellness programs
  • Pet friendly environment
  • A state-of-the-art wireless resident call system
  • Medication management available
  • Preventative health screenings
  • High apartment ceilings and spa showers
  • Transportation services seven days per week
  • Housekeeping services
  • Maintenance services
  • Utilities and cable included
  • Move-in coordination
  • Respite stay accommodations

Enhancing quality of care through design

in Blog
Created: 28 February 2018
Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Enhancing quality of care through design Last week, I attended an accessible design symposium at the Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York City to see what ideas I could use with elders in long-term care. Through listening to the symposium speakers, reading descriptions of works featured […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Enhancing quality of care through design Last week, I attended an accessible design symposium at the Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York City to see what ideas I could use with elders in long-term care. Through listening to the symposium speakers, reading descriptions of works featured […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News:

Image

Enhancing quality of care through design

Last week, I attended an accessible design symposium at the Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York City to see what ideas I could use with elders in long-term care. Through listening to the symposium speakers, reading descriptions of works featured in the student design contest and viewing the Access+Ability exhibit, I found more than I had expected.

Crash course in accessible design

I suspect I’m not the only McKnight’s reader with a lack of knowledge about accessible design — even though we work with elders with abilities that are typically different than those of younger adults.

Patricia Moore, introduced as “the mother of universal design,” told the audience that her elderly grandparents inspired her work. They struggled to maintain their independence in a world that made it difficult for them. “Grandma wasn’t broken,” she said. “The tools we gave her were inadequate.”

In my crash course in accessibility, I learned that objects can be designed in ways that increase the mismatch between our bodies and the environment or, in accessible design, to intentionally decrease that mismatch. For example, the standard design of a walking cane allows it to fall to the floor, making it difficult to retrieve for someone with mobility problems. In the Cooper Hewitt exhibit, I saw canes that stayed upright when not in use.

Another speaker discussed how “designing for disability” very often results in products that are good for everyone, such as books on tape, height adjustable desks or ramps for building access that are used by parents pushing strollers and travelers with rolling suitcases, in addition to those with walkers or wheelchairs.

Nothing about us without us

There was a small, vocal group of disability activists present. When I entered the symposium I was handed a card from their organization that read, “Nothing about us … without us.” They echoed the sentiment of the speakers that increasing the diversity of people designing products and systems results in products and systems that work better for a larger number of people.

Including elders and direct care staff in more of the decisions that affect them within our organizations is likely to result in better decisions.

For the entire article, visit:

Enhancing quality of care through design

Jeweled Hearing Aids

 


Read full article on mybetternursinghome.com