What Is Long-Term Care?

Long-term care refers to a comprehensive range of medical, personal, and social services coordinated to meet the physical, social, and emotional needs of people who are chronically ill or disabled. A nursing home facility may be the best choice for people who require 24-hour medical care and supervision.

What Type of Care Do Nursing Homes Provide?

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care -- like bathing, getting dressed, and eating -- as well as skilled care. Skilled nursing care is given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments.

How Can I Find the Right Nursing Home?

Finding the right nursing home takes time. It is important to begin the search for a suitable nursing home well in advance of seeking admission to the facility. There are often long waiting periods for available accommodations. Planning ahead also can make the transition of moving into a nursing home much easier.

About Nursing Homes

A nursing home, convalescent home, skilled nursing facility (SNF), care home, rest home or intermediate care provides a type of residential care. It is a place of residence for people who require continual nursing care and have significant difficulty coping with the required activities of daily living. Nursing aides and skilled nurses are usually available 24 hours a day.

Residents include the elderly and younger adults with physical or mental disabilities. Residents in a skilled nursing facility may also receive physical, occupational, and other rehabilitative therapies following an accident or illness. Some nursing homes assist people with special needs, such as Alzheimer patients.

Residents may have specific legal rights depending on the nation the facility is in.

Before the Industrial Revolution, elderly care was largely in the hands of the family who would support elderly relatives who could no longer do so themselves. Charitable institutions and parish poor relief were other sources of care.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care—like bathing, getting dressed, and eating—as well as skilled care given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments. Skilled care also includes services provided by specially trained professionals, such as physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists

Features included

  • 3 Chef-prepared meals daily and restaurant style dining
  • Dynamic calendar of activities, outings and Watercrest Institute classes
  • Salon and Spa Services on-site
  • Coastal Living design complete with pool, verandas, and outdoor living spaces
  • Spacious apartments with washer, dryer, and kitchenettes
  • 24-hour licensed staffing and world class personal care
  • Wellness programs
  • Pet friendly environment
  • A state-of-the-art wireless resident call system
  • Medication management available
  • Preventative health screenings
  • High apartment ceilings and spa showers
  • Transportation services seven days per week
  • Housekeeping services
  • Maintenance services
  • Utilities and cable included
  • Move-in coordination
  • Respite stay accommodations

Taking teamwork to a deeper level

in Blog
Created: 13 March 2018
Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Taking teamwork to a deeper level When we think of teamwork in long-term care, we envision a group of dedicated specialists working together to provide the best care for our residents. They read notes from other disciplines, bounce ideas off colleagues at the nursing station and […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Taking teamwork to a deeper level When we think of teamwork in long-term care, we envision a group of dedicated specialists working together to provide the best care for our residents. They read notes from other disciplines, bounce ideas off colleagues at the nursing station and […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News:

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Taking teamwork to a deeper level

When we think of teamwork in long-term care, we envision a group of dedicated specialists working together to provide the best care for our residents. They read notes from other disciplines, bounce ideas off colleagues at the nursing station and convene care plan meetings.

In reality, teamwork in long-term care is much more complex.

Teamwork basics

Team members include not just clinical staff, residents and family members, but other workers who frequently have an influence on care, including housekeepers, laundry workers, maintenance staff and security guards. To enhance teamwork, these employees should be included in in-service trainings that might initially appear beyond their purview, such as customer service training and education about the medical and behavioral information they may need to relay to the nurses.

Teamwork is strengthened when team members understand the work of their colleagues and when it can best be utilized. For example, a lack of understanding of the difference between psychology and psychiatry services can cause delays in the receipt of needed treatment. Consider monthly training lunches that can boost morale, increase interdepartmental understanding and improve team functioning.

Team members also include those outside the facility, such as medical specialists, dialysis centers and hospitals, as well as consultants who provide onsite care such as psychiatrists, dentists, respiratory therapists and others.

Unifying all these team members requires uncomplicated and reliable conversation and correspondence. Communication can be enhanced in a variety of ways, including computerized records that eliminate paper consults and indecipherable handwriting, enhanced change of shift reports that include behavioral as well as physical information and a management commitment to staff retention to create the stability necessary for a solid team.

Taking it further

Once teamwork basics of role understanding, stable staffing and communication are covered, teams can begin to address teamwork at a deeper level.

Deep teamwork involves observing how the floor, unit or neighborhood is functioning as a whole over different shifts.

A team is not functioning well if a disruptive resident is keeping others awake at night or frightened during the day. Nor is it a high functioning team if two staff members are in a personal argument that’s obvious to all who walk onto the floor.

Deep teamwork calls for observing the interactions of the team and intervening as necessary to guide them back on track.

For the entire article, visit:

Taking teamwork to a deeper level


Read full article on mybetternursinghome.com