What Is Long-Term Care?

Long-term care refers to a comprehensive range of medical, personal, and social services coordinated to meet the physical, social, and emotional needs of people who are chronically ill or disabled. A nursing home facility may be the best choice for people who require 24-hour medical care and supervision.

What Type of Care Do Nursing Homes Provide?

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care -- like bathing, getting dressed, and eating -- as well as skilled care. Skilled nursing care is given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments.

How Can I Find the Right Nursing Home?

Finding the right nursing home takes time. It is important to begin the search for a suitable nursing home well in advance of seeking admission to the facility. There are often long waiting periods for available accommodations. Planning ahead also can make the transition of moving into a nursing home much easier.

About Nursing Homes

A nursing home, convalescent home, skilled nursing facility (SNF), care home, rest home or intermediate care provides a type of residential care. It is a place of residence for people who require continual nursing care and have significant difficulty coping with the required activities of daily living. Nursing aides and skilled nurses are usually available 24 hours a day.

Residents include the elderly and younger adults with physical or mental disabilities. Residents in a skilled nursing facility may also receive physical, occupational, and other rehabilitative therapies following an accident or illness. Some nursing homes assist people with special needs, such as Alzheimer patients.

Residents may have specific legal rights depending on the nation the facility is in.

Before the Industrial Revolution, elderly care was largely in the hands of the family who would support elderly relatives who could no longer do so themselves. Charitable institutions and parish poor relief were other sources of care.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care—like bathing, getting dressed, and eating—as well as skilled care given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments. Skilled care also includes services provided by specially trained professionals, such as physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists

Features included

  • 3 Chef-prepared meals daily and restaurant style dining
  • Dynamic calendar of activities, outings and Watercrest Institute classes
  • Salon and Spa Services on-site
  • Coastal Living design complete with pool, verandas, and outdoor living spaces
  • Spacious apartments with washer, dryer, and kitchenettes
  • 24-hour licensed staffing and world class personal care
  • Wellness programs
  • Pet friendly environment
  • A state-of-the-art wireless resident call system
  • Medication management available
  • Preventative health screenings
  • High apartment ceilings and spa showers
  • Transportation services seven days per week
  • Housekeeping services
  • Maintenance services
  • Utilities and cable included
  • Move-in coordination
  • Respite stay accommodations

Enhancing organizational communication improves outcomes, reduces adverse incidents

in Blog
Created: 28 June 2018
Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Enhancing organizational communication improves outcomes, reduces adverse incidents McKnight’s Long-Term Care News frequently notes stories about rogue employees engaging in illegal and disturbing behavior and then trying to cover it up after the fact. There are regular reports about intra-organizational systems that fail, leading to wrongful […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Enhancing organizational communication improves outcomes, reduces adverse incidents McKnight’s Long-Term Care News frequently notes stories about rogue employees engaging in illegal and disturbing behavior and then trying to cover it up after the fact. There are regular reports about intra-organizational systems that fail, leading to wrongful […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News:

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Enhancing organizational communication improves outcomes, reduces adverse incidents

McKnight’s Long-Term Care News frequently notes stories about rogue employees engaging in illegal and disturbing behavior and then trying to cover it up after the fact.

There are regular reports about intra-organizational systems that fail, leading to wrongful death lawsuits and other problems, such as this one about a resident who died from scabies.

Occasionally there’s an article about a whistleblower alerting the authorities about a questionable practice, resulting in repercussions for the company.

It’s very likely that there were employees who noticed that things were going awry before these stories became stories.

I know I’m not the only one who has observed that in some facilities, staff reports of potential problems are met with appreciation for the alert before rectifying the situation, while in other nursing homes, information is so often ignored that it is no longer reported. These vast differences in the culture and communication style of organizations directly impact health outcomes.

In a New York Times article last week, “A More Egalitarian Hospital Culture Is Better for Everyone,” author Pauline W. Chen, M.D. detailed efforts to alter interactions between hospital staff members, moving from an authoritarian style to a more egalitarian approach.

In authoritarian hospital cultures — those with a “do as I say” management strategy — nurses feel powerless to affect change. Patients fare worse in authoritarian environments than in egalitarian hospitals where nurses are regularly asked for input and senior management staff meet consistently with clinicians.

The article describes a program called Leadership Saves Lives, which created significant cultural changes in a relatively short time frame and improved clinical outcomes. The effort involved “guiding coalitions,” with the more successful coalitions having more diverse membership, including participants across departments as well as frontline, mid-level and top leadership and administrative staff.

Effective groups were able to elicit authentic contributions from members, who felt that their perspective was welcomed and valuable, and they found ways to handle conflict, fatigue and motivation over time.

While this particular study focused on hospitals, long-term care — with its similar interdisciplinary team approach and fragile population — might take note. Authoritarian, top-down communication makes it less likely that workers will notify supervisors about practices that could negatively affect the health of residents and could potentially lead to litigation and unfavorable press.

Teachable moments

While there’s a temptation to blame rogue workers for their mishandling of an event (and to feel relief that the situation happened elsewhere), we’d be better off viewing these events as teachable moments for any organization.

For the entire article, visit:

Enhancing organizational communication improves outcomes, reduces adverse incidents

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Read full article on mybetternursinghome.com