What Is Long-Term Care?

Long-term care refers to a comprehensive range of medical, personal, and social services coordinated to meet the physical, social, and emotional needs of people who are chronically ill or disabled. A nursing home facility may be the best choice for people who require 24-hour medical care and supervision.

What Type of Care Do Nursing Homes Provide?

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care -- like bathing, getting dressed, and eating -- as well as skilled care. Skilled nursing care is given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments.

How Can I Find the Right Nursing Home?

Finding the right nursing home takes time. It is important to begin the search for a suitable nursing home well in advance of seeking admission to the facility. There are often long waiting periods for available accommodations. Planning ahead also can make the transition of moving into a nursing home much easier.

About Nursing Homes

A nursing home, convalescent home, skilled nursing facility (SNF), care home, rest home or intermediate care provides a type of residential care. It is a place of residence for people who require continual nursing care and have significant difficulty coping with the required activities of daily living. Nursing aides and skilled nurses are usually available 24 hours a day.

Residents include the elderly and younger adults with physical or mental disabilities. Residents in a skilled nursing facility may also receive physical, occupational, and other rehabilitative therapies following an accident or illness. Some nursing homes assist people with special needs, such as Alzheimer patients.

Residents may have specific legal rights depending on the nation the facility is in.

Before the Industrial Revolution, elderly care was largely in the hands of the family who would support elderly relatives who could no longer do so themselves. Charitable institutions and parish poor relief were other sources of care.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care—like bathing, getting dressed, and eating—as well as skilled care given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments. Skilled care also includes services provided by specially trained professionals, such as physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists

Features included

  • 3 Chef-prepared meals daily and restaurant style dining
  • Dynamic calendar of activities, outings and Watercrest Institute classes
  • Salon and Spa Services on-site
  • Coastal Living design complete with pool, verandas, and outdoor living spaces
  • Spacious apartments with washer, dryer, and kitchenettes
  • 24-hour licensed staffing and world class personal care
  • Wellness programs
  • Pet friendly environment
  • A state-of-the-art wireless resident call system
  • Medication management available
  • Preventative health screenings
  • High apartment ceilings and spa showers
  • Transportation services seven days per week
  • Housekeeping services
  • Maintenance services
  • Utilities and cable included
  • Move-in coordination
  • Respite stay accommodations

The tumult of turnover

in Blog
Created: 13 August 2018
Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: The tumult of turnover I once rode down a crowded afternoon elevator with the CEO of a managed care company. “It must be 5:01,” he commented wryly. I heard a measure of scorn for his employees’ lack of dedication to the job. What I saw was […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: The tumult of turnover I once rode down a crowded afternoon elevator with the CEO of a managed care company. “It must be 5:01,” he commented wryly. I heard a measure of scorn for his employees’ lack of dedication to the job. What I saw was […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News:

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The tumult of turnover

I once rode down a crowded afternoon elevator with the CEO of a managed care company. “It must be 5:01,” he commented wryly. I heard a measure of scorn for his employees’ lack of dedication to the job. What I saw was a group of people fleeing from utterly uninspiring and unappreciated work.

Similarly, in long-term care facilities with high staff turnover, some may see an absence of commitment on the part of workers, while others recognize that there’s something wrong with the job and the way employees are being treated. If workers are fleeing for the private sector, it’s not because they have an intense desire to work at Burger King.

Managers are no doubt familiar with many ramifications of turnover, such as the time and expense of finding and training new hires, the overtime costs for filling in shifts and the need to engage expensive agency workers. It’s also recognized that staff become demoralized in a high-turnover environment and that the quality of care can suffer — two points worth considering in more depth.

When key employees depart — such as nursing supervisors, department heads and nurses — direct care staff may be hesitant to bring problems to new workers just settling in to their jobs. Without the ease that develops between team members over time, important information may not be relayed, glitches in the system aren’t identified and resolved, and problems can fester and multiply.

When staff retention is low, workers become burned out on meeting new team members. They don’t want to put in energy toward welcoming newbies because they know the likelihood is that the individual isn’t going to stick around. This exacerbates the problem because a new worker who doesn’t feel welcomed is less likely to remain with the job.

The impact on residents is profound. Residents are in a vulnerable position, reliant on others for their most personal needs. It’s difficult for them to adjust to being assisted with toileting and bathing by a familiar person, but an unpredictable rotation of strangers who are new to the work adds another level of stress to their lives. For residents with dementia, expect an increase in distress — and the kinds of behaviors that make new hires less likely to remain on the job.

Turnover begets more turnover.

For the entire article, visit: The tumult of turnover


Read full article on mybetternursinghome.com