What Is Long-Term Care?

Long-term care refers to a comprehensive range of medical, personal, and social services coordinated to meet the physical, social, and emotional needs of people who are chronically ill or disabled. A nursing home facility may be the best choice for people who require 24-hour medical care and supervision.

What Type of Care Do Nursing Homes Provide?

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care -- like bathing, getting dressed, and eating -- as well as skilled care. Skilled nursing care is given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments.

How Can I Find the Right Nursing Home?

Finding the right nursing home takes time. It is important to begin the search for a suitable nursing home well in advance of seeking admission to the facility. There are often long waiting periods for available accommodations. Planning ahead also can make the transition of moving into a nursing home much easier.

About Nursing Homes

A nursing home, convalescent home, skilled nursing facility (SNF), care home, rest home or intermediate care provides a type of residential care. It is a place of residence for people who require continual nursing care and have significant difficulty coping with the required activities of daily living. Nursing aides and skilled nurses are usually available 24 hours a day.

Residents include the elderly and younger adults with physical or mental disabilities. Residents in a skilled nursing facility may also receive physical, occupational, and other rehabilitative therapies following an accident or illness. Some nursing homes assist people with special needs, such as Alzheimer patients.

Residents may have specific legal rights depending on the nation the facility is in.

Before the Industrial Revolution, elderly care was largely in the hands of the family who would support elderly relatives who could no longer do so themselves. Charitable institutions and parish poor relief were other sources of care.

Nursing homes offer the most extensive care a person can get outside a hospital. Nursing homes offer help with custodial care—like bathing, getting dressed, and eating—as well as skilled care given by a registered nurse and includes medical monitoring and treatments. Skilled care also includes services provided by specially trained professionals, such as physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists

Features included

  • 3 Chef-prepared meals daily and restaurant style dining
  • Dynamic calendar of activities, outings and Watercrest Institute classes
  • Salon and Spa Services on-site
  • Coastal Living design complete with pool, verandas, and outdoor living spaces
  • Spacious apartments with washer, dryer, and kitchenettes
  • 24-hour licensed staffing and world class personal care
  • Wellness programs
  • Pet friendly environment
  • A state-of-the-art wireless resident call system
  • Medication management available
  • Preventative health screenings
  • High apartment ceilings and spa showers
  • Transportation services seven days per week
  • Housekeeping services
  • Maintenance services
  • Utilities and cable included
  • Move-in coordination
  • Respite stay accommodations

Dr. El’s ‘Quality of Life’ star ratings are the way to go

in Blog
Created: 28 August 2018
Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Dr. El’s ‘Quality of Life’ star ratings are the way to go The Nursing Home Compare star rating system assesses quality of care based on health inspections, staffing and quality of resident care measures. It examines important factors such as emergency preparedness, resident/staff ratios, re-hospitalization rates, […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News: Dr. El’s ‘Quality of Life’ star ratings are the way to go The Nursing Home Compare star rating system assesses quality of care based on health inspections, staffing and quality of resident care measures. It examines important factors such as emergency preparedness, resident/staff ratios, re-hospitalization rates, […]

Here’s my latest article on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News:

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Dr. El’s ‘Quality of Life’ star ratings are the way to go

The Nursing Home Compare star rating system assesses quality of care based on health inspections, staffing and quality of resident care measures. It examines important factors such as emergency preparedness, resident/staff ratios, re-hospitalization rates, falls and antipsychotic use.

After writing about turnover in my last column, I wondered what might happen if high marks were also awarded to facilities for strong staff retention, which has been positively correlated with better care (in this research, for example). From there, I began to imagine an entire rating system based on my view of long-term care.

I think of nursing homes holistically, as microcosms that thrive when each group of participants is thriving. The three groups in each long-term care world are the residents, staff and families. If these contingents are happy, it’s more likely that there will be filled beds, fewer lawsuits and reduced turnover expenses, consequently making CEOs happy.

The supplemental rating system would be based on quality of life rather than on quality of care and it would examine the quality of life of all the participants.

The ratings would review:

  1. Staff turnover — To improve retention, facilities would invest in their staff members not just by reviewing their salaries (because nobody goes into direct care for the money), but also by investing in training, onboarding, teamwork, educational reimbursement and other initiatives (such as offering onsite childcare) that make the organization a good place to work over the long haul.

  1. Resident independence and uniqueness — This facet focuses on how well residents are encouraged and assisted to maintain their interests and connections, reducing depression and creating a more lively, joyful environment. Greater opportunity for resident autonomy would result in decreased “behaviors,” reduced use of medications, improved staff retention, fewer empty beds and positive public relations when skillfully publicized. To accomplish this, therapeutic recreation would be elevated to its proper position as a crucial department charged with designing programs that enhance life for all within the home. A director of volunteers would be hired and supported, psychology services would be well-utilized and the social work department would be staffed in a way that allows social workers to exercise the skills they were trained for rather than being limited to charting admissions and facilitating discharges.

For the entire article, visit:

Dr. El’s ‘Quality of Life’ star ratings are the way to go


Read full article on mybetternursinghome.com